Archive for the ‘OSX’ Category


Below are instructions for configuring Google Chrome to read Web sites not written in the English alphabet. 

Manually Switch Encoding

If you see Roman alphabet gibberish (e.g. *a&h!!) instead of the correct script, you may need to For some Web sites, such aswww.csssm.org (Chinese Simplified), you will need to manually switch from Western encoding view.

Example of Roman Character Gibberish

Roman Character Gibberish - Window says µ Ú 227 Æ Ú

Change Encoding (Windows 7)

  1. Click the settings (wrench) icon after the URL address bar and select Tools → Encoding to view the current encoding..
  2. If necessary switch from Unicode (UTF-8) or Western (ISO Latin 1) to an appropriate encoding. In some cases you may need to scroll to the end of the menu.
  3. If there is more than one option per script, select one until the page displays properly.
  4. AFTER you leave the site, you may need to switch your browser back to your original setting.
 

Change Encoding (Macintosh)

  1. Under the View menu, select Encoding.
  2. If necessary switch from Unicode (UTF-8) or Western (ISO Latin 1) to an appropriate encoding. In some cases you may need to scroll to the end of the menu.
  3. If there is more than one option per script, select one until the page displays properly.
  4. AFTER you leave the site, you may need your browser back to your original setting.

 

Fonts In Chrome

Google Chrome automatically matches system fonts with the appropriate language encoding. As long as the appropriate fonts for each language are installed, Chrome will probably be able to interpret a properly encoded page.

If you do not see the content, you need to install the correct font as listed on the individual By Language pages.

Also See 


The latest update to OS X Mountain Lion Developer Preview 3 seems to have partially enabled iOS-style automatic app downloads in the App Store. Like on the iPhone and iPad, when you buy and install an app on one of your Macs, all of your other Macs logged into the same App Store account will automatically install the app too.

Unfortunately, the feature does not seem to be working completely. While the App Store will still offer to enable automatic downloads (as seen above), it does not actually install anything when you purchase apps from another computer. However, it does apparently show the app as being installed when you view it in the App Store. There is a good chance we will see at least one more developer preview, or at least a GM, in the coming weeks that should fully enable the feature.



Now Playing iTunes Dock notification

Using a defaults write command, the iTunes Dock icon can be set to display a “Now Playing” song and artist pop-up that transitions in and out and music starts. It’s a nice addition, particularly if you’re playing songs from a shared network playlist and have iTunes hidden in the background.

Enable the iTunes song & artist Dock icon popups

Open the Terminal in /Applications/Utilities/ and type the following:
defaults write com.apple.dock itunes-notifications -bool TRUE

Now kill the Dock to relaunch it:
killall Dock

Start playing a song in iTunes to see the notification appear, it’ll disappear automatically and then reappear briefly anytime a new song starts.

If you decide you don’t like the notification, disabling the iTunes song popup is just as easy:
defaults delete com.apple.dock itunes-notifications

You won’t need to relaunch iTunes, but you will need to kill the Dock again.

This only works in Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, if you try it in prior versions nothing happens.